Watch Episode 3 of the 1A Auto Talk & Tune Show

We just completed episode 3 of the 1A Auto Talk & Tune show, and it went quite smooth! Dan and I talk about intake manifold water leaks, 3000 mile oil changes, and the best features to have in a modern vehicle. Backup cameras? 10 cup holders? Automatic parallel parking? Traction control? What’s your favorite feature?

We also came to the realization that episode 2 felt a little stiff, so we did our best to stay loose in this one.  The cloudy day helped the glare on our receding hairlines as well, which we both appreciated.

Got questions? Got answers? Got an awesome build-thread of your car / truck project?

Leave us a comment!

Watch Episode 2 of the 1A Auto Talk & Tune Show

If you follow along with the 1A Blog, our Facebook page, our Youtube channel, or you know, the internet… You might possibly have seen that we have created a short, weekly, question & answer show. We are officially done with episode 2, and we have decided to call it the “1A Auto Talk & Tune” show. Right now, it’s me and Dan.  We are typical “car-guys”. We own vehicles that go fast, and are always wondering what modification to do to our vehicles next. That being said, we may mix more people into this show over time to add a little variety. With so many automotive enthusiasts in the business, it would be a shame if you didn’t get to meet more of them right?

So how did this week’s episode go? Well. We talked about bear claws with exclamation points, destroying automatic transmissions, swapping automatics to manuals, and replacing shocks and struts. Looking back, we may have been a little too wordy this time around. Don’t worry though! We are learning incredible amounts from each episode that we shoot, and we are looking forward to answering more of your questions next week.

Leave us a question below!

Episode 1 of the 1A Auto Question & Answer Session

This past week at 1A Auto, we wanted to try something new and exciting that had never been done before.  I hopped onto the 1AAuto Facebook page and asked our Facebook friends for some hard-hitting car questions. I then grabbed my coworker Dan and set up a camera so that we could answer these questions on video.  Dan had no idea what he was getting into, and I gave him very little time to prepare, yet he handled it like an absolute pro. We were both a bit camera shy because this was our first Question & Answer Episode. If you like it, please let us know, share it with a friend, and tell us what you think about the questions in the video. If it goes over well, we’ll make more.

What Does The Sleeve On The Lower Brake Caliper Bolt Actually Do?

bolts

If you have ever had the pleasure of doing a brake job on a rusty car before, you have likely encountered the engineering nightmare that is known as a “lower brake caliper slide bolt.” Now… if you have erased this hardware-laden memory from your brain, or aren’t familiar with this style of bolt, I’ll do my best to help out. This is the type of bolt that doesn’t want to come out of its hole because rust has essentially fused it with the brake caliper bracket. It’s the bolt that gives you a few hope-filled turns with a pipe-extended, half inch drive ratchet and then crushes your dreams when it becomes stuck solid for absolutely no logical reason. It’s the threaded evil that requires a chisel and sledgehammer to remove when the ratchet fails to do it’s-one-job. Yep. That’s the bolt we’re talking about here today.

If you have ever successfully removed this bolt (which not many have in the North East), you know that it has a rather cute little rubbery sleeve on the end of it as if to mock each one of your herculean removal efforts. The upper caliper bolt does not have this cute rubber sleeve, so why in the world did the car manufacturer put one on the bottom caliper bolt? The truth is, I don’t have an answer for that. However, I have spent quite a few late night hours in search of the truth, and I’m now here to share with you the one theory that makes the most sense to me.

These cute little rubber caliper bolt “sleeves” (that’s the most common name for these) are anti-rattle devices for the calipers.  The sleeve provides additional friction, which prevents the brake caliper from rattling/chattering within the confines of the caliper bracket. It works similarly to a shock absorber, where it slows down and dampens the movements of the calipers. As long as the whole system stays rust free and lubricated, it’s truly a simple and effective system. However, when that rubbery sleeve prevents the caliper bolt from sliding, or rust begins pulling the vehicle back into the earth, all bets are off.

So does this theory make sense? Do you have a better explanation of what the rubber caliper bolt sleeve actually does? Tells us in the comment box below.

Finally, a Repair Video on a Clown Head Antenna Ball!

Do you find yourself staring at your faceless, beat up, and weathered antenna ball, wondering how in the world you will ever be able to replace it? Of course! Everyone does! Luckily for us, 1A Auto has finally created the video that we have all been waiting for. It shows exactly how to replace your old, faceless, disheveled antenna ball with a fresh new clown-head antenna ball. We’re making dreams come true, one clown-head antenna ball at a time.