On Ebay: 12 Old Jaguars Covered in Dust.

Like any car enthusiast, I often find myself scouring eBay Motors for cars and trucks that I can’t have.  While doing so, I stumbled onto a fleet of Jaguars that looked noteworthy.  Apparently they were collected between 15-25 years ago, and haven’t really been touched since.  The thing that I find most impressive is that a bunch of them are “racked” up high in a warehouse of some sort. You need to be a truly dedicated & motivated gearhead for those kinds of shenanigans.  I mean how cool would it be to be able to look up at  project cars while you work on others?  Anyway, the starting bid is $200,000, so get out your wallets.

Here is what the auction includes along with misc parts:

1961 XKE 6-Cylinder Coupe 2-Seat (Orange)

1964 XKE 6-Cylinder Coupe 2-Seat (Black)

1966 XKE 6-Cylinder 2-Door Coupe (Black)

1967 XKE 6-Cylinder 2-Door Coupe (Maroon)

1968 XKE 6-Cylinder Coupe 2+2 (Blue)

1969 XKE 6-Cylinder Convertible (Red)

1969 XKE 6-Cylinder Coupe 2+2 (British Green)

1970 XKE 6-Cylinder Coupe 2+2 (Silver)

1970 XKE 6-Cylinder Convertible (Red)

1971 XKE V12 Coupe 2+2

1974 XKE V12 Convertible (Red)

1974 XKE V12 Convertible (Blue)

And here is the eBay Listing

eBay Daily Deal: The Greatest Tool Ever Invented

Saturday, February 27th is a big day, because 1AAuto.com has a product up on eBay Motors Daily Deal.  It is a beautiful mechanic’s tray with dual rubber coated magnets.  Although it looks like a museum piece, it is rugged to the core.  We have used these ourselves in environments that make the average magnetic bolt tray cry for mercy, while the 1AAuto tray kept asking for more!  With paint and construction this nice, the 1AAuto magnetic tray makes all other trays look inadequate.  It could win a beauty contest while completely covered in grease, rust and mud.  The magnets on the bottom are stronger than average and have no trouble holding piles of leftover bolts from any project.  It is a great addition to any tool box, and will likely make your friends and coworkers jealous.  For this price, it’s a no brainer, everyone needs one.

EBay Item number 230441637235

Embarrassment: Your High School Vehicle

In high school, my friends and I drove some really, really crappy cars.  We knew that they were crap, yet we invested fist fulls of money and months of time into them as if they were going to have a huge payout someday.  Apparently foresight was not taught in school.   Somehow putting $1500 of stereo system in a $30 car made a lot of sense at that point in our lives.  On the bright side, the cars were so crappy that it allowed our creativity to really shine.  We could do any ridiculous modification that we wanted because the car was worthless to begin with.  If we messed up, it was still a worthless car.   Racing stripes? Sure! Painted windows? You Bet! Backwards seats? ummm, yes?  We learned many valuable life lessons on these cars, and we wouldn’t have be the same without them.  Pictures above is a friend / coworker’s high school driven 1983 Olds Delta 88 in the prime of it’s life.  It was a car that we were proud to cruise in for obvious reasons. Thank goodness for high school cars.

Colorado Speed Supercharged LS7 Drift Truck

coloradorendering

The guys at Hitman Hotrods and MBRP Inc. are building what appears to be the most awesome Chevy Colorado known to mankind.   As if tubbing and caging a basically new 2007 Chevy Canyon wasn’t cool enough, they went ahead and stuck a supercharged LS7 in it, backed by a T-56 6-speed.  Drool. Multipurpose racing with 1000 horsepower is the intention, and they appear to be on the right track.  Let’s see how it performs on the 1AAuto Blog Pure Awesomeness list:

- LS7 engine that has no business under the hood? Check!
- 1000 horsepower? Check!
- Manual transmission? Check!
- 10 second quarter mile times? Check!
- Massive front AND rear tires? Check!
- 6 (yes 6) Brake Calipers? Check!
- The stance of absolute perfection? Check!
- Ability to scare people with the engine off? Check!

1998 BMW Z3: Jeremy’s Automotive Review.

You probably won’t believe this, but car companies aren’t throwing keys at me and begging for me to review their latest creations.  Shocking right?  So I’m doing things a bit differently than most.  I will be begging for, borrowing and buying cars, driving them for a while in the real world, and then letting everybody know what I thought.  The huge benefit to this is that I will be driving real cars, not Pagani Zonda’s.  By all means, if a fresh Pagani lands in my driveway, I am willing to take it for a jaunt around the block, but my celebrity status isn’t at that level just yet. So until then, with your help, I will be tackling the slower and carbon fiberless real world vehicles.

First up: My very own 1998 BMW Z3.

Let me start off by stating that all of my life I have hated BMW’s.  Granted, I had also never driven a new one, so my opinion was completely biased.   Each one that I had the “pleasure” of driving felt like a 7000 lb gutless turd that was filled with cracked leather and broken electronics.  While not nearly as bad as the Saab’s, Buick Reatta’s, or Cadillac Allante’s, it always seemed like I needed to know a secret slap-the-dash move to make stuff work.

Fast forward to last summer.  My friend’s neighbor said “Hey Jeremy, I have a BMW Z3 that I don’t want, it’s got some issues (no surprise), you wanna buy it?”  I checked it out and decided that BMW’s couldn’t be all that bad.  Maybe I did need a little bit of the ultimate driving machine in my life.  The price was very right, and with the top down, summer sun was going to be better than ever.

Drivetrain:

The Z3 is a 1.9L with a 5 speed manual and 90K miles. It is not the slowest thing that I have ever driven, but it feels like a typical 4 cylinder as far as power goes.  The truth is that the engine feels rock solid, way more so than any of my other vehicles.  I could probably rip 3 spark plugs out and the little devil 1.9L may not even notice, it feels like a tank.  The 5 speed transmission is a different story.  Mine was completely replaced at 60K by a BMW dealer, which means it only has 30K on it.  Instead of feeling like a new transmission, it feels sloppy.  I’m not sure if all BMW manual transmissions feel like this, but it is just not sporty feeling like I expect to find in a 2 seater sports car.

Steering and Suspension:

It’s small, and light so the steering feels tight & fast, especially with the relatively wide tires.  The suspension on the other hand feels like it has 90K miles.  It lacks heavily as far as sportiness goes, leaning too much, and being more bouncy than firm.  If you buy one with 1998 suspension still attached, new shocks and struts should be the first priority on the list of parts to buy.  If the suspension parts were new, I bet it would handle & drive 100X better than it does currently.

Interior Pros:

- Heated seats are toasty hot.

- The stereo sounds decent for an OE 1998 system.

Interior Cons:

- Incredibly awful. I hate nearly everything about the interior.

-  The steering column doesn’t adjust down.  Seriously BMW? Really? My knuckles are against the windshield!

- The seats and door panel belong in a 1985 Celica.  They could not be more sleep inducing.

- The cup holders are right where your elbow is and they are too small for a medium ice coffee.  Buy a coffee and it’s “Cya Armrest!”

- The power windows move in slow motion.  I have honestly never seen a vehicle with slower moving windows. The time it takes to roll the windows up or down is measured in hours.

- The dashboard styling is really dated.  It’s like they designed a crazy round unique shaped body, and then said “we have no time left to design a dashboard, here is one from a 1983 Mercury Capri, customers will never know.”

- The heat and A/C blowing ability is offensive. Then again, why am I driving a convertible with the heat or A/C on?

Exterior:

The looks of the car are pretty good overall, it’s really a matter of taste though.  The fit and finish is all original and it really is high quality.  The paint still looks fresh, and everything opens and closes properly.  My only gripe is the headlights that are yellowed.  Unfortunately all plastic headlights eventually look like that. I need to spend some time polishing them to make them pretty again.

Overall:

Overall, I am glad I bought the car.  It is a lot of fun on warm days, and with a little maintenance it could be a really fun car on windy roads or an auto x track. My biggest gripe is that I feel like people are calling me names and giving me dirty looks.  I may need to paint it flat black and add some numbers to the side so that people don’t assume I’m a rich snob.

To Do List: Shoehorn Viper Engine into a Cuda.

While flipping through some of last year’s local cruise night pictures, I came across a car that deserves to be swooned over by people other than myself.  Under the hood of a 1970-74 Plymouth Cuda, you expect to find a hopped up 340, 440, or maybe the 426 (since apparently everybody has one these days), but this one is unique.   It has an injected Dodge Viper engine lurking under the hood with all the accessories in place.  I see the car quite frequently at all the local cruise nights and I can’t help but admire it every time.  My absolute favorite part about it is that it clearly gets driven regularly.   It’s spotless, but not spotless enough to be mistaken for a trailer queen.  If I knew who the owner was I would give him a high-five for building such an awesome looking car, but sadly I don’t.  The best I can do is post pictures up for the world to be jealous of.  So, here you go world.  Well done Mr. CudaViper owner, very well done.

BM7JME9HYRCC

Weekly Rotting Car: 1933 Plymouth PC

Sad Looking 1933 Plymouth PC

Sad Looking 1933 Plymouth PC

Sometimes you look back in life and realize that you let some awesome cars slip right through your hands.  This is a story about one of those cars, and I think about it all too often.  It began about 15 years ago when my parents bought a “drivable” 1933 Plymouth PC 4 Door Sedan.  Unknown to my parents at the time of purchase, this was an extremely rare car.

Back in 1933, cars didn’t have fancy model names like “Zephyr” or “El Camino”, they just had model numbers.  Boring, I know.   Even with its brand new fancy-pants one-year-only straight 6 engine, it didn’t have a chance of survival.  The great depression was hurting the country worse than ever, and Plymouth had decided to remake the 1932 bodies (for all intents and purposes) and call it a 1933 PC model.  Much to Plymouth’s surprise, the few customers that they still had were less than impressed with this grand idea.  The Plymouth PC was built for a mere 3 months before they ended production early and switched to the longer wheelbase PCXX and PD models.  That’s right, the customers hated the PC and wanted something different, so Plymouth gave them a longer vehicle.  At least it wasn’t a 1932 model anymore, right? Several years later, WWII began, and cars were being crushed and melted left and right to make war vehicles.  Naturally, the cheapest, crappiest cars out there were the first ones on the chopping block.  (Almost sounds like the Cash For Clunkers program!)  For reasons unknown, my parents Plymouth had survived all these years against all of these unimaginable odds.

Ok, enough of the history lesson,  let’s get back to when the vehicle arrived in the driveway, shall we?  My dad is the best technician I have ever met by leaps and bounds, and he was doing a little nitpicking of the new 4 wheeled acquisition.  A grind here, and hammer there, and pretty soon a frame-off restoration was in full swing.  In his defense, the “drivable” car was built of 80% body filler, 13% rivets, and 7% original sheet metal. The lack of solid body was bad enough that it had to be redone by somebody with more time, the right tools, and more work space.  So off it went to a body guy.  Weeks passed and a fair amount of money exchanged hands.  Frequent phone calls from the body guy assured my parents that everything was going great.  New metal was going on, and it was going to be straight as an arrow when they got it back. Yippy!

A month had passed since we last saw the car, and out of the blue my dad received a phone call from the a storage unit owner looking for rent money.  “What the?”  Well, the body guy had put the Plymouth body and misc parts into a rented storage unit, and took off with the cash.  Nice guy right?  He had never even touched the car, which was truly crushing.

Weeks turned into months, and months turned to years.  The sour taste for this once loved vehicle never left their mouths, which understandably left this ultra rare pile of auto parts sitting dormant in the yard for many years.

At about 18 years old, I just couldn’t take it anymore.  I decided I would take charge of the project and teach myself how to do nice bodywork because I couldn’t stand to see it rot.  Hundreds upon hundreds of hours went into that car.  Cutting rot, welding 300+ rivet holes in the roof, fitting the suicide doors, assembling, building a new firewall, removing the doors again, reassembling….. and on and on it went.  Within a summer, it was finally running again.  It was far from drivable, but it did run.

Going Back Together Again!

Going Back Together Again!

Then, the big move happened.  The house was sold and all the rolling stock had to move from the old house to the new.  “Temporarily” the car went to my brothers house.  Temporary then turned into permanently, and before long, the car was parted out and sold piece by piece.  Yes, it was all gone as quick as that, and I am still sickened from it.  Unfortunately, I lacked time to finish it, and space to work on it.  I already had too many cars and had to make choices.  Looking back I would have done things a lot differently, it’s too bad I can’t get it back because I would have loved to finish it.  Hopefully this Plymouth’s parts have helped bring others back to life again. That is what I tell myself at least.

If you happen to know the whereabouts of any of the major parts from this car, I would love to hear from you and see your own Plymouth project!

What kinds of cars you have you let slip away? Leave me comments!

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