If coolness were Land Mass, This Engine would be the Louisiana Purchase.

If coolness were a land mass, this engine would be the Louisiana Purchase.  It has fuel injection, electronic ignition, and a centrifugal supercharger feeding a pair of large turbochargers.  Oh yeah, and it also appears to have a little nitrous to keep things scary.  The owner of this metallic masterpiece has combined every straight six owner’s crazy automotive dreams and put them into physical form.   I don’t know how much horsepower it makes or how fast the car runs, but my guess is that it will hit 1.21 gigawatts faster than you can say “easily tuned”.

The Mystery of the EVO IX Cylinder Head Drill Holes.

EvoIXhead

Let’s say you own a Mitsubishi Evolution IX, and want nothing more than to stand there and admire the turbocharged delicacy that resides beneath your hood.  You reach down for the hood release and are instantly greeted with the firm “thud” of the hood-pop in action.  Reluctantly, you free yourself from the hug-like grip of your race-inspired Recaro seat as you hop out of your machine.  The opened-windowed door closes behind you.  You walk toward the front of the vehicle while holding intense eye contact with your freshly cleaned 14-spoke BBS 17’s.  The hood is then effortlessly lifted toward the sky and you are greeted with one of the finest examples of Mitsubishi technology to ever roll off the assembly line, the 4G63.

Within an instant, your eyes focus on something that is clearly out of place.  It is something so strange that you aren’t sure if it belongs there or not.  You have looked at nearly eleven billion EVO’s in the past, but never noticed this kind of nonsense. You are stunned, disappointed, and nearly jallywagged. “What was the purpose of these drilled out holes in my cylinder head!?” you screamed at the heavens.  Sadly you are answered with the deafening sound of silence.

Maybe one of the readers can help?

The sweetest car collection….. in the Woods.

One of my favorite things to do in “off  seasons” (read: cold seasons), is to look at abandoned & wrecked old cars in the woods and in the junkyards.  I’m not really sure why I enjoy looking at old rotten cars, but it’s probably the same reason that dogs chase cats; because they can.  I have come across some really amazing vehicles over the years, but one of my all time favorites was finding a large wooded area of TriFive Chevy’s, most of them being 1957’s. There were probably about 20 of them, and almost all models were present from two doors, to 4 doors, and even wagons. Other than the convertibles & Nomads, no model was spared from this automotive atrocity.

Got a picture of an old rotten car ?  If so, send it over to jnutt@1aauto.com, and I will make sure it gets up here.

Replacing a Side View Mirror

Recently we replaced the passenger side power mirror on a 1997 S-10 Blazer.  The owner of this Blazer got a bit too close to a support column in a parking garage, and broke the mirror at the hinge.  (Note the custom duct tape repair.)

The tools we used for this installation:

  • A 7mm nut driver
  • A 10mm socket & ratchet
  • A flat head screwdriver
  • A Phillips head screwdriver
  • A door panel removal tool

First match your new part to the one you are replacing to be sure it’s the right one. It’s better to find out now that after you have your whole door torn apart.

On some vehicles there is a small access panel that needs to be removed to expose the mounting bolts or nuts.  The small access panel allows easier mirror replacement, and is usually attached with only 2 or 3 plastic door panel clips.  Our 1997 S-10 Blazer unfortunately did not have this access panel, so we had to remove the whole interior door panel for replacement.

Most door panels are held on by a few bolts and screws, plastic door panel clips, and the lower lip of the window opening.

We first removed two 7mm bolts inside the door pull handle.  There was also a trim screw on the door handle bezel.  The window and lock switch panel can also be removed for easier access to the plastic door panel clips inside.  Once the hardware is removed, take your door panel clip removal tool and wedge it between the door and the door panel itself, slide the tool along until the tool runs into a clip.  Position the tool so the clip is in the middle of the fork, and pry the clip out.  Use of a door panel clip removal tool lessens the chances of damaging the door panel, and in most cases you can also reuse the clips.

Once all the hardware is off, and the clips are released from the back of the door panel, carefully lift the door panel up and over the lip of the window opening.

Now the door panel is only held by the inside door panel bezel and handle, but you can turn it to access the mirror mounting holes.

Next you need to reach into the door and disconnect the mirror power cord.  Then remove the 3 foam rubber covers over the access holes, and remove the 3 10mm nuts that hold the mirror to the door.

A tip to prevent dropping the nuts into the door panel and completely ruining your day:  Apply a bit of grease to the end of your socket to help hold the nuts.

The first step to the installation is to plug the new mirror in, and make sure it works properly.

Next reattach the mirror with 10mm nuts (remember the grease trick).  Then reinstall the door panel. Inspect the plastic clips to be sure none are broken. If they are, you will need to replace them.  Reinstall the 2 7mm bolts in the pull handle and the trim screw in the door handle bezel.

This 1969 Firebird convertible Never saw this coming…

Sometimes you go to a car show and find that the most interesting vehicles are the ones in the parking lot.  What we have here is a giant aluminum cow (or is it a bull?) sitting atop a 1969 Pontiac Firebird Convertible.   Before discovering this amazing relic, I had often found myself awake at night wondering if the addition of a giant aluminum animal would improve the look of my vehicle.  Luckily for me, this person proved that it wasn’t as great as I had once imagined.  Thank goodness, because I was really having a tough time finding a giant aluminum Impala to sit on my Impala. » Continue reading more of this post…

The 1AAuto Blog has entered the building.

The Hands of a 1A Auto Blogger.

I am absolutely thrilled to announce the launch of the 1AAuto “Nutts and Bolts” Weblog.  I know what you’re thinking, “why are there are two T’s in the word Nutts? Is there already a typo in this thing?”  Nope.  It is not a joke, and it’s not even a typo.  Jeremy Nutt is my name, and I will be the primary editor of this internet breakthrough of an automotive blog.  With a last name like mine, you really need to take charge of the never ending genealogical ridicule, and begin to make the name work for you.  I really had no choice in this matter; I just had to put my name to work.  Thus, “Nutt’s and Bolts” was born.

The foundation of this exquisite piece of computerized literature is constructed of cars, trucks, and everything else automotive.  It will quickly grow to become your favorite hangout for riveting automotive articles, how-to’s, news, product reviews, videos, pictures, and plenty of entertaining banter.  As if that isn’t enough, the greatest part of the entire Nutts and Bolts Blog will be you, the reader.   Seriously!  You have the full ability to respond to anything I (we) write.  I know you have plenty of things to fess up about, and I want to hear it.  So, cheers to you!  Now, let’s get this thing fired up!

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