RPOTD: Most Awesome 1954 Chevy? Edition

Random Picture Of The Day

 

1954 Chevy Bel Air

There are a few cars out there that I’m basically in love with, and this is one of them.  I see this car at all the local car shows, and my friends have to literally drag me away from it kicking and screaming every time.  I can’t get enough of it.  If you think it looks good in the picture, you should see it in person.  The body lines, the stance, chopped roof, stainless trim, subtle body mods, engine bay, and interior are all perfection.  As far as 1950′s customs go, it just doesn’t get any better than this in my mind.

Image Borrowed From:
http://image.automotive.com/f/features/10642394+soriginal/0811sr_01_z+1954_chevy_bel_air+front_driver_side.jpg

Taking it Back to 1984 with “Fat Charlie”

Recently I had the pleasure of working on an absolutely beautiful 1984 Chevy Caprice.  I know, I know, “absolutely beautiful” and “Caprice” probably shouldn’t ever be used in the same sentence.  However, I assure you that this car is an exception to the rule.  This big fella, nicknamed “fat Charlie” by its owner, was clearly babied from the start, and always well taken care of.  He was parked indoors, and only driven when necessary which kept the mileage down around 2800 miles per year.  Yes, you did read that correctly, Charlie has just over 70K miles on it today.

When Charlie arrived in my driveway under the cover of darkness (don’t ask), he had a saggy headliner, stripped out windshield wiper arm, a leaky muffler, and a directional that only wanted to make left turns.  All were easy fixes that I thoroughly enjoyed doing.  Every nut and bolt was removed without a fight, and I took special care on everything I removed because I didn’t want to damage any of the original interior trim that was in perfect condition.  Overboard? Yea, maybe, but I love cars.

Several days later, Charlie had officially passed the state inspection, and I got to take the big guy for a truly enjoyable jaunt down the road.  It basically feels like a brand new 1984 car.  There is plenty of room for you and 16 of your closest friends, it has power everything, and the floats like a Cadillac down the bumpiest of roads.  I even got thumbs up from multiple people!  Going forward, Charlie will be kept in the family of the original owner, and driven and enjoyed daily for the foreseeable future.  Maaaybe Charlie will even make it to some local cruise nights?  We’ll see. :)

Any other 1980′s B-Body fans out there?

Serial Numbers On Glass?

serial number glass

I worked on an absolutely beautiful 1984 Chevy Caprice recently, and noticed that it had engraved serial numbers on all the glass.  I understand why they do it, but is this common?  I have worked on about 11 trillion cars, and this is the first that I have seen like this.

Oh great 1AAuto Blog Readers, please school me on this. Common? Not Common? Does it actually thwart thievery? Is it just another way for dealers to grab money?  Who has this on their cars?

Bonus Note: That is me in the reflection, with the camera phone. Hi.

Yes: Throw That On A 4×4 Chassis.

El Camino 4x4

Whenever you mix free time and El Camino’s, you can guarantee that something amazing will happen.   In this case,  the mid 70′s body style El Camino that everyone loves to hate became a 4 wheel drive monster.  The brush guard was functional and ready for some action, and so was the solid front axle.  In all honesty, it was put together fairly well.  Under more normal conditions, the body would have been connected to the frame with drywall screws and tie-down straps.  This one was far better.  It used real metal and wasn’t a giant turd like most 4×4 chassis swaps that I have seen.  While I can’t picture myself in this vehicle, I have great appreciation for anybody that puts their time and effort into a car.   So cheers to you mid 70′s El Camino 4×4 chassis swap dude, and to a job well done!

We’re All In The Same Club!

At The 1AAuto Car Show!

Ok ladies and gents, this topic has been on my mind for a while now and today I’m going to let it out as eloquently as possible.  The bottom line is:  There is some kind of unnecessary harsh feelings between the older generations and the younger generations in the automotive world.  It doesn’t seem to be one sided, and I’m beginning to think that it is the fear of the unknown.  Why should a young guy like a 1954 Chevy? and What is so great about being hella-flush? The answers aren’t important, but how you go about learning them is.

Appreciation

First and foremost, I believe that a car enthusiast should be a car enthusiast.  If it has wheels and an engine, a true car enthusiast should be able to appreciate it on some level.  When a person has poured their heart and soul into their car, a true enthusiast should be able to look at it and say “wow, I may not personally like the x, y, and z, but I can most definitely appreciate the amount of blood, sweat and tears that went into this car”.  Unfortunately that is not reality.  More often than I want to admit, people consider certain cars to be “junk” purely based on the year or the make of the vehicle.   This is the root of the problem in my opinion.

Foreign vs. American Cars

People often base their approval of a vehicle solely on whether it is American or Foreign.  In 2010, American car companies assemble their cars from parts made all over the world, and foreign car makers do the same thing.  Some “foreign” cars are built in America and some “American” cars are built in foreign countries.  In fact, Honda just announced that they built more cars in America last quarter (April-June 2010) than it did in Japan!  The obvious question then arises: If an American car is built in Japan, does that make it an American car or foreign?  Is it right to like the car more or less based on the location where was assembled?  Basing your automotive choices on a vehicle’s features, looks, and options seems far more logical to me.  Am I wrong?  Just imagine for a moment that you are a proud owner of the new Ford Fiesta, and a guy that drives a big-rig truck pulls up next to you and starts informing you of how worthless your Fiesta is because it can’t even haul a 50 foot trailer full of goods.  That would be ridiculous right?  Just because the Fiesta doesn’t haul a trailer full of goods doesn’t mean it is an inferior car, it just means that it does not fit that truck driver’s needs.   Each driver has different needs and each vehicle has a different purpose.  In my mind, you don’t have to like all cars that exist, but you shouldn’t go out of your way to hate a car because it doesn’t suit your specific needs.  This brings me to my next point ….

Car Shows & Cruise Nights

Who is welcome at these events?  Are they intended for “classic cars”?  What is a classic anyway?   The Classic Car Club of America defines a classic car as a vehicle that is 20 to 45 years old. Over 45 years old falls into the Antique category. Ok cool, so I’ll bring a stock 1987 VW Rabbit and my friend will arrive in a 1989 Mitsubishi pickup.  No? They aren’t classic’s? Why not? This is a common issue in the small town automotive world.  How about “newer” cars?  Should a new Ford GT be allowed at a car show or cruise night?  I think so. It’s appreciated by fellow enthusiasts, just like a VW R32, or a 2010 Camaro.  Just because a car isn’t of your particular interest doesn’t mean that it should not be welcomed at a car show / cruise night.  People like different cars for different reasons, and you don’t have to like every car you see.  Just walk by it, it’s that easy!  Do you get offended when a different model car parks next to you at a mall?  Why would an automotive event be any different?  As long as the owner of the vehicle is respectful to you and your car, all should be well in my mind.

Young vs. ……well….”Old..errr”

People drive what they can afford.  If I had unlimited funds, I would have way cooler cars, and I would suspect that you would too if you have made it this far down the page.  A struggling college kid just isn’t able to drop the $10K+ on the muscle car of their dreams, so they drive what they can afford.  Typically that is a newer car that needs some work, but it’s also something that they can drive daily as they learn to spin wrenches.  It doesn’t mean that they don’t dream of big blocks, flat head V8’s, and tunnel rams all night though.  On the other hand, they may have never had the opportunity to pedal a big V8 to regain traction, cruise with a silky smooth straight 6, or hear the amazing popcorn sound from a high compression small block running on race gas.  It isn’t “the norm”, so how can they be faulted for it?

The older generations are typically a bit more established in life, with a little more money, experience, and time to work with.  Thus, they are finally able to have the dream cars of their youth.  Maybe that dream car is a brand new Corvette, or maybe it’s a late 1940’s lead sled. Either way they often go back to the epitome of “cool” when they were younger and follow it all the way to the driver’s seat.  Should the younger generations dislike them for having more expensive cars? Of course not!  That is just as crazy as disliking the younger generations for not having expensive cars.

We’re all in the same club!

What’s cool to today’s youth and cool to older generations may or may not be the same, but in my opinion, appreciation for cars is universal in all car enthusiasts.  If somebody has put their heart and soul into a car, and wants share it with the world, embrace it!  Introduce yourself and talk to the owners of vehicles outside your “norm”.  There are so many amazing features of old cars that can bring smiles to younger generations, and vice versa.  Whether young or old, you don’t have to like every car that you see, but as an enthusiast you should embrace the other enthusiasts around you. After all, they are part of the automotive world just like you are.

Please feel free to share your thoughts and opinions on all of this in the comment box below. I would love to read them!

NOTE: All of the above is the opinion of Jeremy Nutt.

Possibly The Scariest Van Ever?

I roam the interweb  far and wide searching for automotive beauty, and occasionally I strike pure gold.  Is this van the scariest thing that you have ever seen?  Probably.  Does it look like it has a questionable past? Yes.  Does it do wheelies? Please…  Do I want one just like it?  Maybe.  This Chevy Van doesn’t even look safe enough to lean on, never mind the horror show that must happen when you rip on the throttle.   One thing that seems to be missing is the inspection sticker on the windshield?  He must have forgotten to get one. ;)

…. And a wheelie video.

Fantastic pictures borrowed from:

http://www.cncpics.com/main.php

How To: Replace Ball Joints On An S10 Truck

Chevy S10 Trucks, S10 Blazers, GMC Jimmys, and Sonomas eat ball joints.  Being in the biz, we knew this, and we also knew that our customers could benefit from an installation video.  One thing lead to another and BAM! – A beautiful 1AAuto Ball Joint How-To Installation video was born.  With the right tools, and the right patience, this job is very doable in your driveway.

Also feel free to check out our other 1AAuto installation videos on youtube.

Let us know what you think!

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