How To: Replace an Alternator in a Chevy / GMC Truck

Replacing an alternator in a Chevy Silverado Truck (GMC Sierra Truck, Suburban, Yukon, Tahoe) is easier than you may think.  In this video, we show you exactly how it is done so that you can do it yourself and save a bunch of money.  We currently have over 70 how-to videos that you can view on our 1AAuto Youtube Channel.  Everything from headlight and taillight replacements, to door handles, to controls arms and weatherstripping.  Check them out, Subscribe to our youtube channel or add us as a friend, and let us know what you think!

Colorado Speed Supercharged LS7 Drift Truck

coloradorendering

The guys at Hitman Hotrods and MBRP Inc. are building what appears to be the most awesome Chevy Colorado known to mankind.   As if tubbing and caging a basically new 2007 Chevy Canyon wasn’t cool enough, they went ahead and stuck a supercharged LS7 in it, backed by a T-56 6-speed.  Drool. Multipurpose racing with 1000 horsepower is the intention, and they appear to be on the right track.  Let’s see how it performs on the 1AAuto Blog Pure Awesomeness list:

- LS7 engine that has no business under the hood? Check!
- 1000 horsepower? Check!
- Manual transmission? Check!
- 10 second quarter mile times? Check!
- Massive front AND rear tires? Check!
- 6 (yes 6) Brake Calipers? Check!
- The stance of absolute perfection? Check!
- Ability to scare people with the engine off? Check!

Car Wrecks From the 1920′s and 1930′s

While cruising the streets of the world wide web, I landed deep within the pages of a great thread in a motivemag forum. It had some outstanding photos of old car wrecks in it.  Once you get passed the whole human aspect of it, it is truly amazing to see.

Many people assume that cars of that era were slow, but the truth is that many models were quite capable of today’s highway speeds.  In fact, the first car to ever reach 200 mph was in 1927.  Sure it was using plane engines, but it does show that America was deeply craving high speeds.  Almost every car in the 1930′s could easily attain today’s 55 mph speed limit, and many of the vehicles from the 1920′s could too.  Although these cars could clearly get up and go, their skinny tires, leaf spring suspension, mechanical drum brakes, and the dirt roads, made their stopping abilities less than stellar.  Just imagine stopping your own “modern” car with nothing but the parking brake. That is similar to what many of the 1920′s cars had.  Compound that with solid steering columns, steel dashboards, lack of seat belts and safety glass, and you were in rough shape in an accident.  So the next time you hop in your car, open your window, and give a quick shout-out to modern technology.

1967 Chevy Chevelle Bored to Death.

While on one of my weekend junkyard journeys, I came across possibly the saddest looking 1967 Chevy Chevelle in the history of mankind.  It was in tough shape as you can tell, and basic in every possible aspect of the word.  It had some of a small block still hiding under the hood, and a terribly boring automatic transmission to match its painfully bland paint.  I have to assume that this car put the previous owner to sleep every time they looked at it, which ultimately drove the most boring Chevelle ever to its final resting place.

Got pics of rotting cars?  I want to see them!  Send them to jnutt@1aauto.com

Beautifully Rotting Chevy Nova Convertible

While cruising the junkyards a few years ago, I came across a Chevy Nova Convertible that was 98% parted out and left for dead.  This made me sad because:

A) I get emotionally attatched to cars in junkyards

B) Chevy only made these in 1962 and 1963, for a total production of about 50,000 units.

That seems like a lot at first glance, but they made over 300,000 Nova 4 door sedans in the same time frame, in addition to thousands more 2 door sedans and hardtop models.   The unfortunate reality, is that this car has most likely long been crushed, which is really too bad because the body itself didn’t look all that bad.  Here in New England, we rebuild far worse.

The sweetest car collection….. in the Woods.

One of my favorite things to do in “off  seasons” (read: cold seasons), is to look at abandoned & wrecked old cars in the woods and in the junkyards.  I’m not really sure why I enjoy looking at old rotten cars, but it’s probably the same reason that dogs chase cats; because they can.  I have come across some really amazing vehicles over the years, but one of my all time favorites was finding a large wooded area of TriFive Chevy’s, most of them being 1957’s. There were probably about 20 of them, and almost all models were present from two doors, to 4 doors, and even wagons. Other than the convertibles & Nomads, no model was spared from this automotive atrocity.

Got a picture of an old rotten car ?  If so, send it over to jnutt@1aauto.com, and I will make sure it gets up here.

Replacing a Side View Mirror

Recently we replaced the passenger side power mirror on a 1997 S-10 Blazer.  The owner of this Blazer got a bit too close to a support column in a parking garage, and broke the mirror at the hinge.  (Note the custom duct tape repair.)

The tools we used for this installation:

  • A 7mm nut driver
  • A 10mm socket & ratchet
  • A flat head screwdriver
  • A Phillips head screwdriver
  • A door panel removal tool

First match your new part to the one you are replacing to be sure it’s the right one. It’s better to find out now that after you have your whole door torn apart.

On some vehicles there is a small access panel that needs to be removed to expose the mounting bolts or nuts.  The small access panel allows easier mirror replacement, and is usually attached with only 2 or 3 plastic door panel clips.  Our 1997 S-10 Blazer unfortunately did not have this access panel, so we had to remove the whole interior door panel for replacement.

Most door panels are held on by a few bolts and screws, plastic door panel clips, and the lower lip of the window opening.

We first removed two 7mm bolts inside the door pull handle.  There was also a trim screw on the door handle bezel.  The window and lock switch panel can also be removed for easier access to the plastic door panel clips inside.  Once the hardware is removed, take your door panel clip removal tool and wedge it between the door and the door panel itself, slide the tool along until the tool runs into a clip.  Position the tool so the clip is in the middle of the fork, and pry the clip out.  Use of a door panel clip removal tool lessens the chances of damaging the door panel, and in most cases you can also reuse the clips.

Once all the hardware is off, and the clips are released from the back of the door panel, carefully lift the door panel up and over the lip of the window opening.

Now the door panel is only held by the inside door panel bezel and handle, but you can turn it to access the mirror mounting holes.

Next you need to reach into the door and disconnect the mirror power cord.  Then remove the 3 foam rubber covers over the access holes, and remove the 3 10mm nuts that hold the mirror to the door.

A tip to prevent dropping the nuts into the door panel and completely ruining your day:  Apply a bit of grease to the end of your socket to help hold the nuts.

The first step to the installation is to plug the new mirror in, and make sure it works properly.

Next reattach the mirror with 10mm nuts (remember the grease trick).  Then reinstall the door panel. Inspect the plastic clips to be sure none are broken. If they are, you will need to replace them.  Reinstall the 2 7mm bolts in the pull handle and the trim screw in the door handle bezel.

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