This is a Small Block Chevy Powered Suzuki X90

There is never a dull moment on Craiglist. Today, we have a 1997 Suzuki X90 with a small block 355, aluminum intake manifold, Edelbrock 650 cfm carburetor, roller rockers, headers, flowmasters, and a 700R4 transmission with a shift kit. Yes, you read that right. If there was ever a time in your life when you needed to gather up $6500 to purchase a vehicle to scare yourself in, this is it. Let’s be honest, this little red devil would be a handful with your grandma behind the wheel.  Burnouts would be had, and maybe even wheelies. Before long grandma would be crashing through the front of a pharmacy.  Honestly, I’m left nearly speechless.

Check out the real thing on Craigslist

Video: LS Engine Swapped Subaru Impreza.

First off, LS series engines are a new obsession of mine. Secondly, I just so happen to own a Subaru Impreza.  So, it seems fitting that I post up a video of an LS engine swapped Subaru.  The video claims LS-2, but I think it’s actually a cast iron 6.0L LQ4.  Be sure to crank your volume way up for this one. It sounds delish.

Can’t see the video?  Here is the link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o3P0fNRk82Q

All Wheel Drive Civic Hatchback with a 4G63 Turbo Swap

Yes, this is real life. Right now on Craigslist, there is a guy trying to sell his 1994 Honda Civic Hatchback for $7500.  Why so much? Well, because it has an all wheel drive swap and a 4G63 turbo engine (from a Mitsubishi Eclipse).  I got a screenshot quickly just in case it disappeared into history without being documented.

Here is the Listing on Craigslist. Catch it while you still can!

» Continue reading more of this post…

14B VS. EVO VIII 16G Photo Comparison

EVO VIII 16G Compressor

14B VS. EVO VIII 16G Photo Comparison

Recently I installed an EVO VIII 16G turbo on my 6-bolt 4G63 engine swapped 1989 Dodge Ram 50 truck. Since I love seeing how things work, I decided to take them apart and compare them. As you can see in the pictures below, the EVO 8 turbo is a twin scroll and the 14B is not.  The wastegate is far larger on the EVO turbo as well, which is very good news because the 14B internal gate is less than impressive.  Naturally the compressor and turbine wheels are a bit more elaborate on the 16G as well.

My Hypothesis: Math says the EVO VIII 16G should flow about 50% more air than the 14B did, which means more air at less pressure, less heat soak, and twin scroll should make the spool time between the 16G and 14B negligible.

Results from the butt dyno:  The 14B was set at 18PSI and was a lot of fun, because it could break the rear tires loose in 1st and 2nd gear when the turbo spooled.  With the new turbo on and the wastegate plugged directly into the intercooler piping (stock actuator pressure is about 12psi I believe), the truck was neeeearly as fast as the 14B at 18PSI.  It spools at about 150 rpm more than the 14B, and the boost came on so much smoother.  Once I got used to the new turbo, and made sure everything was functioning properly, I cranked the boost up to 20 to see what would happen.

Tire spin in 3rd is what happened.

Traction Bars: Somewhere in the back of my mind, I had a vision of my rear differential wrapping up and ripping my driveshaft apart.  I knew that my truck’s suspension wasn’t exactly designed for 250+ hp, and since I know my stock / lowered suspension was on borrowed time, I decided traction bars would be a smart idea.  Not only would they prevent my truck’s axle from flipping over backward and turning my driveshaft into a pogo stick, but, it might actually provide traction through my Z rated 255/45/18′s!  In went the new traction bars.

As if by some miracle, almost all of my missing traction was back again!  I couldn’t believe it!  These things really work! Now I can keep traction in 2nd gear (if I want), and spinning the tires in 3rd just plain won’t happen no matter how hard I try.

WIN is the word, EVO VIII is the reason, TRACTION BARS is how.

Friday = 2JZ in a 1993 Mustang

Monday = We had an awd turbo dune buggy
Tuesday = It was old-school vs. new-school with the 1929 Whippet SRT-4
Wednesday = There was no choice but to go with the hand built Toyota 2000GT
Thursday = An incredible  ’69 Porsche GT3 build.
Friday = 1993 Mustang notchback with a 2JZ Toyota Supra engine.

I know that today’s build will be hated by some and loved by others, but regardless of personal opinions, it makes an impact.  Today’s project is a fox body Mustang notchback with a 2JZ Toyota Supra engine swap built by a guy named Dan (2JZstang) on supraforums.com.  It makes 650 horsepower at the wheels on E85 fuel and runs a 9.74 quarter mile at 144 mph.  Sick fast. It took him a few years to build it on a budget, and it was almost sold off at one point, but in the end his dream prevailed.  In it’s current state, is brutally awesome, sicknasty fast, and well deserving of high 5′s from every enthusiast in his area code.

Here are a few modifications worth noting:
- 6 Point Cage
- 2JZ engine with stock internals
- Billet Precision Turbo
- 4″ exhaust
- coilovers
- Built 8.8 rear

Videos FTW.

The full build can be found here:

http://www.supraforums.com/forum/showthread.php?t=453217

Favorite Food While Wrenching on Cars?

Imagine it is summer time and you are doing an engine swap with a few friends in the driveway. Lunch time finally arrives, and you need to decide what the perfect food to compliment car-wrenching is.  For me, in the summer, it’s gotta be a delicious home-made cheeseburger.  Heck no, we don’t do frozen pre-made stuff, we have a legit recipe of our own.  Here is an amazing burger that my greasy handed friends and I often devour during a summertime wrench-fest.

Ingredients to make a burger as awesome as ours:
Ground Beef
Jack Daniels Original #7 BBQ Sauce
A-1 Extra Thick Steak Sauce
Land O’ Lakes American Cheese
Martins Potato Rolls
Red Onions
Ketchup

Optional:
Bacon (Let’s be honest, it makes every food better, but its a lot of work.)
Heinz Sweet Relish (I’m the only one that likes it on my burger.)
Marie’s Blue Cheese Dressing (Dip the burger in it, I know, strange…. just try it.)

Instructions to make a delicious burger:
1) In a bowl, combine the beef and some BBQ sauce together. Add BBQ sauce in small portions so that the meat doesn’t lose its ability to hold itself together. You only have one chance to do this right, so take baby steps. Once you overdose the beef with bbq sauce, you fail, because the burger patty falls apart on the grill, leaving you with a bunch of crunchy beef morsels. This is not what we are shooting for.
2) Combine the beef & bbq sauce into ~ 1/4 lb patties. Lay them on a plate with wax paper between layers of patties, that way they don’t stick together.
3) Heat that grill up! Turn it on in advance, and make sure it is hot when the burgers land on it.
4) Drop the burgers onto the hot grill, and let them sit that way until the tops of them start “sweating”. When that begins to happen, flip them. If you flip them early, you burn the outsides, and have a uncooked center. Nobody wants a burnt burger right?
5) IMPORTANT NOTE: Don’t press down on the burgers with the spatula at any point in time. People that do this squeeze all the deliciousness out of them! Sure watching the grill fire flare up is fun, but eating a flavorless, dry, hockey puck is not.
6) When the burger is almost cooked to your liking, dump some A-1 Sauce on it, and then drop the cheese over it. This locks the A-1 steak sauce in with cheesy goodness.
7) Let the cheese melt for a few minutes, and then place the burger onto a potato roll.
8 ) Add diced onions, bacon, relish, ketchup & blue cheese to your liking. I recommend adding the first 4, and then dipping it in blue cheese for the ultimate Nutt’s & Bolt’s Burger.

By no stretch of the imagination is this burger healthy, but it is delicious, and really hits the spot at lunch time after a hard morning’s work.

So what’s your favorite food to eat while wrenching on cars?

Images from:

http://ayahfoods.com/products/_pics/BBQ%20Chicken%20Wings%201kg.jpg

http://www.watchmojo.com/blogs/images/pizza.jpg

http://www.streetsedge.com/images/cheeseburger.jpg

To Do List: Shoehorn Viper Engine into a Cuda.

While flipping through some of last year’s local cruise night pictures, I came across a car that deserves to be swooned over by people other than myself.  Under the hood of a 1970-74 Plymouth Cuda, you expect to find a hopped up 340, 440, or maybe the 426 (since apparently everybody has one these days), but this one is unique.   It has an injected Dodge Viper engine lurking under the hood with all the accessories in place.  I see the car quite frequently at all the local cruise nights and I can’t help but admire it every time.  My absolute favorite part about it is that it clearly gets driven regularly.   It’s spotless, but not spotless enough to be mistaken for a trailer queen.  If I knew who the owner was I would give him a high-five for building such an awesome looking car, but sadly I don’t.  The best I can do is post pictures up for the world to be jealous of.  So, here you go world.  Well done Mr. CudaViper owner, very well done.

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