Because Beautiful Welding Never Gets Old.

In the past, we have touched upon my borderline insane slight obsession with welding once or twice. I just can’t seem to get over the inherent beauty of taking two solid metals, liquifying them with massive amounts of electricity, and watching them flow into each other while hiding behind copious amounts of safety equipment. It’s unbelievably gratifying. The ultra violet light shines brilliantly from the tip of the torch as if it were full of magic, which it is. You are more or less in charge of a mini version of the sun, and you can do whatever you want with it. Liquify a little mild steel here, then maybe some aluminum over there, and if you feel wild, you challenge yourself on some copper.  Then, when that perfect weld happens, you feel as if you just invented the wheel.  High 5′s are handed out by the dozen, and much rejoicing takes place.  Unfortunately, to make consistently beautiful welds takes crazy amounts of skill.  The kind of rare skill that many people do not have, including myself.  The good news is that some of those rare people that are that good at welding take pictures of their work for people like us to sit back and dream about.  “Califonia Jay” from VWVortex is one of those people. » Continue reading more of this post…

TIG Welding Is Definitely an Art…..Still

While we are on the TIG welding subject, here is the picture of the day.  It’s no big deal, just one of the most beautiful welds ever.  Agtronic Motorsport created this stainless steel work of art.  Be sure to click on it for the full screen.

Image Found at http://www.honda-tech.com

You Want To Take Your Toaster To The Next Level?

Sometimes car enthusiasts can’t let their fabrication skills stop in the garage.  They have 1 too many diet mountain dews, and things start getting wild.  Pretty soon, the TIG welder is fired up and the kitchen fabrication project begins.  “vectorsolid” whipped up a pretty slick toaster mod recently which is well documented on honda-tech.com.

He wrote “That’s right, taking breakfast and drag racing to a whole new level. We didn’t feel a turbo charged toaster would yield the proper golden brown, crispy toast we all know and love. So we went ALL MOTOR with this beast.”

“Proper” old school, stainless steel, 2 slot toaster. This bad johnny knows how to cook the competition. And with a fraying 1950′s cloth cord, possibly cook the user…  ….Sleeved block, ITB’s. Amazing pop outta the hole. Will smoke ‘em all day long.”


At the track… Easily passed tech. According to the little knob on the side it’s certified to “8″. the golden tone on the toast was achieved with a setting of “3″. Imagine the smoke show this thing would put on dialed up to “8″. No dyno can hold it… You don’t mess with the all motor toaster…”

Is a drag racing chassis necessary for a toaster? Yes.  Is is way cool? You bet.  Would I trust the toast coming out of it?  Nah.

Found On:

http://honda-tech.com/showthread.php?t=2821902

TIG welding is an art, but Not everybody is an artist.

Last year I finally bought myself a TIG welder so that I could weld aluminum, stainless steel, roll cages, and overall, step up my welding game.  I figured since I had been MIG welding for 10+ years, TIG would be a piece of cake, but boy was I wrong.  TIG welding is an absolute art, but not everybody is an artist.  It takes a boat load of practice and dexterity to be good at it, which is why professionals make the big bucks.  As I mentioned in this blog that I wrote a few weeks ago, MIG welding can be done with 1 hand (blind folded, tango dancing, while on fire).  TIG on the other hand requires holding filler rod with the left hand, a torch in the right hand (at the correct angle), and it has a foot pedal to control the heat.  Once you get all three limbs to work in unison, metal begins to melt, and the learning curve really begins.

Faster than I could say “this is hard to do!“, I had burned through 2 tanks of argon, countless filler rods, several pieces of tungsten, and a few layers of skin.  As I quickly learned, aluminum retains heat really well, and doesn’t look hot even when it is.  Note to readers: WEAR GLOVES when TIG’n!

Here are a few “finished” pieces from my last practice session. Like I said, TIG welding is an art, and not everybody is an artist, yet.