Tip Of The Day – POR-15 Paint Can Edition

If you have ever used POR-15 before, you likely have learned three things:

A) It’s pretty darn awesome stuff if you live in a place where rust exists. (I’m looking at you New England.)
B) You do not want to get it on your person. While it doesn’t have the ungodly hell-fire burning sensation that “Aircraft Remover” does, it does have an unbelievable sticking ability to humans.
C) If you get the POR-15 between the can and the lid, and then seal the can, your all done. The can will never EVER reopen without the use of a sawzall, a 20 ton press, and a log splitter…

Today I have the solution for letter “C”, because I’m not completely sure that humans have the technology to conquer “B” yet.

Now, since I’m extraordinarily cheap, and …well… yeah I guess that’s the only reason, I don’t ever buy the proper paint pouring device for these paint cans (yes, I realize that they are like $1).  So I have been forced to develop an amazingly complicated (that’s a lie) method of preventing this paint-lid-non-removal conundrum. It’s what I like to call “tape”. Yes, I put tape on the can folks. It allows me to clean off my brush if I have too much of the good stuff on it, AND it makes clean-up effortless. Maybe you already do this, and I’m living my life pre-Y2K, but hey maybe not. I don’t know. But for that one guy that hasn’t tried this yet, I recommend it. Old news? Cool idea? You decide.

 

Carburetor Rebuild Tip Quicky

When you rebuild a carburetor that hasn’t been used in a long while, the jets are guaranteed to be clogged up. There are tools that you can buy to pick all of the crusty nougat out of the microscopic holes, but I have a different method that works terrific. First, I like to disassemble the entire carb and dunk all of the parts into a bucket of carburetor cleaner. They sell these cleaning buckets at nearly every local auto parts store, and most have trays inside so that you don’t have to fish your hands inside to grab the parts out. Once the carburetor soaks for about a day, I begin attacking all of those clogged up jets and orifices. Now, as I mentioned before, we all could buy the proper tools intended for doing this, but my quicky carburetor rebuild tip is to use steel guitar string. It is filthy-dirty-stinkin’ cheap, somebody you know probably has some that they will give you, and it comes in fairly awesome lengths and sizes. I know absolutely zero about guitars, but I do know that the smallest “normal” guitar string easily cleans out carburetor jets. It is firm enough that it won’t bend if you push it, and flexible enough to go around gentle curves in the carb. The only thing you have to watch out for is getting speared by it. It’s basically the size of a needle, so pushing on the end of it will go right through your skin like it isn’t even there. Like every tool in your tool box, you need to fear it. If you do, it will last forever, and reward you with an awesome running carbureted engine.

Got carburetor rebuild tips, hints, or tricks? Share them with us!

+Jeremy Nutt

How To Get The Phillips Screw Out Of The Brake Rotor

Eventually, your car will need new brake pads and rotors. Don’t bother trying to escape it, because you can’t.  If you are lucky though, you have a car that doesn’t have the stupid phillips head screws holding the rotors on to the hubs.  I was unfortunately not so lucky recently, but I have destroyed enough of these little screws to eventually figure out a way to get them out.  Guess what else?  I’m going to show you how! » Continue reading more of this post…

Automotive Tips & Tricks: Suggestion #4

Tip #4

The Automotive lesson today is:

When you drop your cut off wheel on the ground, or step on it, the wheel is going to break and leave you standing there surprised…. again. No matter how many times you try, you can’t just fold it back and use the broken blade because you know it flies off dangerously every time.  Seriously? You gotta stop trying that.